10 February 2014

No. 37 -- 7 June 1932

Mr. N.A. Hughes,
C/o Y.M.C.A. College,
5315 Drexel Avenue,
CHICAGO. Ill. U.S.A.

My dear Noel,

Your two letters of May 5th and May 9th reached me safely. The earlier one came to the home and the one with the later date came direct to the office.

I am glad it was not necessary for you to have the gold inlay in your teeth. No doubt the cost would have been very heavy.

We are sorry to learn that you are having such a difficult time in your last quarter. We can readily understand unless work is available you will have great difficulty in financing yourself, especially in the smaller amounts which one must have available in his pocket.

"Today I sent you 25 dollars in
American money as requested
in your letter. The unfortunate part
of it is that to send what would
be normally equal to £5,
cost £8:16:5. There is the difference in
the English sterling plus the difference
in exchange between Australia
and America. These two things
combined, make sending money
a ruinous matter."
Your letter of the 9th helped us to understand these problems much better than any other letter you had hitherto sent. Today I sent you 25 dollars in American money as requested in your letter. The unfortunate part of it is that to send what would be normally equal to £5, cost £8:16:5. There is the difference in the English sterling plus the difference in exchange between Australia and America. These two things combined, make sending money a ruinous matter. Just think of it, to send £5:0:0, one must spend £3:16:5 additional. However, we are very glad to be able to send this to you, and wish it could have been more. This will enable you to pay your dentist and the other small amounts you refer to, and will give you a few shillings in your pocket.

I have been trying hard to get rid of the amplifier and today I called in to see Johnny Walsh. Johnny assures me that there is very little call for machines of the kind, but his advice is that we again advertise it and if unsuccessful in disposing of it, we may have to dismantle it and sell the parts. Of course, this is a pretty difficult matter and will take some time to effect. It would be great if we could sell it just as it is for a reasonable figure.

We note that you have nothing further to add concerning work over the summer period. Evidently you seem inclined to remain at the College and undertake work for Dean Ames. Personally I think this is the wisest plan. While there may be more interest in going with your friends to St. Louis, I really believe it would advance your personal interests more if you accept Dean Ames offer and remain with him. He may also be able to get you additional work in some of the Associations. Could you not exploit that to the limit? Could Larry Bowen help you in any way or Norman Weston? Do not feel at all reticent in approaching any of them for this purpose.


I am glad that you were ale to get some additional work with the Building Superintendent in connection with the windows of Dole Hall.

Your suggestion that we might arrange a loan for you at this end, does not commend itself to me in that it would possibly be misunderstood. If you do not leave Chicago for the summer period you should have a better chance to look around and exploit all the possibilities in that territory. We quite realise it will be possibly more difficult with the increasing unemployment to secure remunerative work next year, and on that account I think you may have a better chance if you are on the spot and thus able to secure anything that may open up in and around Chicago.

The book on Chicago which you mentioned, has so far not been delivered. Presumably it will come in a later mail. I think you are wise to send books of the type home as you get opportunity. In the majority of cases, steady acquisition of books over the next few years, may mean a trunk load of them at the end; far better to send them on as you get opportunity.

I am sorry that you have been compelled to resign your Pledgeship to the Fraternity. Let’s hope that things will brighten for you so that you may be able to continue it next year.

Your debt to Oscar Peterson could easily be liquidated if we are successful in disposing of the machine and in any case we must find some way of meeting it for you.

We note that you deem it advisable for us to continue sending your letters direct to the College. Presumably if you change your address the letters will be forwarded in due course.

I am delighted to learn that you are doing speaking work and I hope you will take every opportunity that presents itself in that direction. Mother was deeply interested in your address at the Settlement in preparation for Mother’s Day.

"Keith is still out of a job.
I am sorry to report that in the
Accountancy examination he was
not successful in passing in any
one of the five subjects. He was
just a mark or two under in several
of them. This, of course, has
disappointed him a great deal,
but he is continuing his studies
and I have no doubt he will get
through next time."
Now just a little concerning home news. We have not had many changes in home circumstances. Keith is still out of a job. I am sorry to report that in the Accountancy examination he was not successful in passing in any one of the five subjects. He was just a mark or two under in several of them. This, of course, has disappointed him a great deal, but he is continuing his studies and I have no doubt he will get through next time. It is unfortunate that he should be so close and not get the additional few marks required.

Ruth is much better I am happy to say. No doubt she will be writing to you if she has not done so recently. Edith and Joyce are getting along quite well, and mother is keeping exceedingly well. Rex has sent for his clothing so that it looks as if it will be some time before he returns to Melbourne. Edith did fairly well in her term examinations, and her aggregate of marks, strangely, was reduced by her failure in such a subject as drawing. On the whole though, her marks were good. We have not yet received Joyce’s report but presumably that will come to hand any day now.

We had Mr. Tucker in last week, pruning the fruit trees and getting everything in readiness of the coming summer. I think we should have a good crop of fruit if I can judge by the buds that are already appearing on the trees.

Our friend Lee, next door, will be leaving Harrison’s house about the 3rd week of the month, so that I suppose the Harrisons will be coming back as neighbors. I have not seen them for quite a long time.

Last week we had a Bible Study School at our little church, particulars of which you will find on the enclosed circular. It was a splendid success and every night we averaged between 50 and 60 people in the five or six groups. The public addresses were exceedingly well attended and on Sunday night we had the Young People’s Service as the closing function. I took a half-hour community hymn sing before Church and Mr. Watkins gave the address. At the conclusion of his talk he made a very strong appeal for decision for Christ and about 25 young people came forward indicating their desire to accept and follow Him. Among them were Joyce and Edith. Naturally this gave us great joy and we are very delighted with the results both of the Bible Study and the Young People’s service.

BOYS' SUBURBAN CLUBS. (1932, May 28). 
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic. : 1848 - 1957), p. 12.
Retrieved February 7, 2014,
from http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4454550
In the Association we have had excellent meetings in most of the Departments and there is a good spirit in the work. We are planning a membership campaign in July as one of the functions in connection with our 60th Anniversary. Quite a number of other gatherings will be held and I will send you particulars of these a little later on.

Over the weekend (King’s Birthday) 45 young people went to Park Orchards for a Conference. This group was made up largely of the Combined Y.M. & Y.W.C.A. discussion group. I am enclosing a picture that appeared in the “Herald” of June 6th. You will see some familiar faces int he picture including Kath, Jim Ralston, Olive Yates, Jean Chamberlain, May Chivers. Ern Gollan reported that they had a thoroughly good conference.

Work parties went down to both Manyung and Shoreham. The Fathers’ Club, 13 strong, went to Shoreham and cleared about two acres of the reserve alongside the came site.

We have made changes in the payment of fees to as to meet the difficult conditions. The annual fee can be paid in two half yearly amounts and the gymnasium and other privilege fees can be paid quarterly. This is a radical change in our financial arrangements but is demanded by the times through which we are passing.

"Let’s hope the elections in
New South Wales and Queensland
next Saturday will result in the
return of a sane Government. If this
occurs I think we shall probably reach
bottom this winter and from
 then on there will be a change
for the better."
Let’s hope the elections in New South Wales and Queensland next Saturday will result in the return of a sane Government. If this occurs I think we shall probably reach bottom this winter and from then on there will be a change for the better.

Well, my boy, we must close off now. I can only say that I am sorry I am not in a position to give you more substantial help. Just now things are particularly difficult for me, as I have three lots of income tax to meet, the payment on the house and quite a number of extras that I did not bargain for. All of these things combined have left me very short. I can only say that I hope conditions will not be so difficult; in a few months’ time I may be able to do a little more for you than I have done hitherto.

We all unite in sending you our warmest love,
Yours affectionately,
Dad

M.O. made payable to Noel Hughes